Unit 2, Chapter 5 CPO Science Foundations of Physics Chapter 9 Unit 2: Motion an

Unit 2, Chapter 5 CPO Science Foundations of Physics Chapter 9 Unit 2: Motion an www.phwiki.com

Unit 2, Chapter 5 CPO Science Foundations of Physics Chapter 9 Unit 2: Motion an

Wilman, Marianne, Executive Producer has reference to this Academic Journal, PHwiki organized this Journal Unit 2, Chapter 5 CPO Science Foundations of Physics Chapter 9 Unit 2: Motion in addition to Force in One Dimension 5.1 The First Law: Force in addition to Inertia 5.2 The Second Law: Force, Mass, in addition to Acceleration 5.3 The Third Law: Action in addition to Reaction Chapter 5: Newton’s Laws: Force in addition to Motion Chapter 5 Objectives Describe how the law of inertia affects the motion of an object. Give an example of a system or invention designed to overcome inertia. Measure in addition to describe as long as ce in newtons (N) in addition to pounds (lbs). Calculate the net as long as ce as long as two or more as long as ces acting along the same line. Calculate the acceleration of an object from the net as long as ce acting on it. Determine whether an object is in equilibrium by analyzing the as long as ces acting on it. Draw a diagram showing an action-reaction pair of as long as ces. Determine the reaction as long as ce when given an action as long as ce.

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Chapter 5 Vocabulary Terms as long as ce inertia law of inertia Newton’s first law net as long as ce dynamic equilibrium static Newton’s second law locomotion newton (N) action reaction Newton’s third law 5.1 The First Law: Force in addition to Inertia Key Question: How does the first law apply to objects at rest in addition to in motion Students read Section 5.1 BEFORE Investigation 5.1 5.1 Force Force is an action that can change motion. A as long as ce is what we call a push or a pull, or any action that has the ability to change an object’s motion. Forces can be used to increase the speed of an object, decrease the speed of an object, or change the direction in which an object is moving.

5.1 Inertia Inertia is a term used to measure the ability of an object to resist a change in its state of motion. An object with a lot of inertia takes a lot of as long as ce to start or stop; an object with a small amount of inertia requires a small amount of as long as ce to start or stop. The word “inertia” comes from the Latin word inertus, which can be translated to mean “lazy.” 5.1 Newton’s First Law Can you explain why the long table would make the trick hard to do

5.2 Newton’s Second Law The acceleration of an object is equal to the as long as ce you apply divided by the mass of the object. 5.2 Newton’s Second Law If you apply more as long as ce to an object, it accelerates at a higher rate. 5.2 Newton’s Second Law If an object has more mass it accelerates at a lower rate because mass has inertia.

5.2 Newton’s Second Law a = F m Force (newtons, N) Mass (kg) Acceleration (m/sec2) 5.2 Newton’s Second Law Three as long as ms of the second law:

5.2 Calculate acceleration A cart rolls down a ramp. The cart has a mass of 500 grams (0.5 kg). Using a spring scale, you measure a net as long as ce of 2 newtons pulling the car down. Calculate the acceleration of the cart. 5.2 Calculate acceleration Three people are pulling on a wagon applying as long as ces of 100 N,150 N, in addition to 200 N. The wagon has a mass of 25 kilograms. Determine the acceleration in addition to the direction the wagon moves. 5.2 Calculate as long as ce An airplane needs to accelerate at 5 m/sec2 to reach take-off speed be as long as e reaching the end of the runway. The mass of the airplane is 5,000 kilograms. How much as long as ce is needed from the engine

5.2 Calculate as long as ce A tennis ball contacts the racquet as long as much less than one second. High-speed photographs show that the speed of the ball changes from -30 to +30 m/sec in 0.006 seconds. If the mass of the ball is 0.2 kg, how much as long as ce is applied by the racquet 5.2 Equilibrium The condition of zero acceleration is called equilibrium. In equilibrium, all as long as ces cancel out leaving zero net as long as ce. Objects that are st in addition to ing still are in equilibrium because their acceleration is zero. Objects that are moving at constant speed in addition to direction are also in equilibrium. A static problem usually means there is no motion. 5.2 Calculate as long as ce A woman is holding two dogs on a leash. If each dog pulls with a as long as ce of 80 newtons, how much as long as ce does the woman have to exert to keep the dogs from moving

5.2 The Second Law: Force, Mass, in addition to Acceleration Key Question: What is the relationship between as long as ce, mass, in addition to acceleration Students read Section 5.2 BEFORE Investigation 5.2 5.3 Newton’s Third Law “For every action there is an equal in addition to opposite reaction.” This statement is known as Newton’s third law of motion. Newton’s third law discusses pairs of objects in addition to the interactions between them. 5.3 Newton’s Third Law The astronauts working on the space station have a serious problem when they need to move around in space: There is nothing to push on. The solution is to throw something opposite the direction you want to move. This works because all as long as ces always come in pairs.

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5.3 Calculate as long as ce Three people are each applying 250 newtons of as long as ce to try to move a heavy cart. The people are st in addition to ing on a rug. Someone nearby notices that the rug is slipping. How much as long as ce must be applied to the rug to keep it from slipping Sketch the action in addition to reaction as long as ces acting between the people in addition to the cart in addition to between the people in addition to the rug. 5.3 Newton’s Third Law Locomotion is the act of moving or the ability to move from one place to another.

5.3 The Third Law: Action in addition to Reaction Key Question: Can you identify action-reaction as long as ces Students read Section 5.3 BEFORE Investigation 5.3 Application: Biomechanics

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